Effects of feedback from near-peers and non-medical professionals on e-portfolio use

May 22, 2018 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

Ming-Jung Ho, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar
Yu-ting Chiu, National Taiwan University
Keng-lin Lee, Kantar Insights

Background

The medical education literature suggests mixed success in the use of portfolios, and previous research has reported that feedback from mentors is a crucial contributor to success. In addition to teachers and peers as mentors, might near-peers and non-medical professionals be able to support medical students engaged in the portfolio process? This study aims to investigate the effects of feedback from near-peers and non-medical professionals on medical students’ reflective portfolios.

 

Methods

131 medical students at National Taiwan University submitted three e-portfolio entries reflecting on key professional competencies. In addition to teachers and peers, each student was matched to one senior medical student (i.e. near-peer) and one non-medical professional trained to provide feedback. The e-portfolios were scored according to a rubric. At the end of the semester, 81 students completed a questionnaire consisting of 5-point Likert scale-based and open-ended questions.

Results

The results show that students found the feedback from near-peers and non-medical professionals beneficial. Students agreed that feedback not only helped them in writing their e-portfolios (mean scores: 3.43– 3.49; standard deviations [SDs]: 0.77– 0.82), but also enhanced their self-reflection (mean scores: 3.43– 3.53; SDs: 0.79– 0.92), especially in the case of near-peer feedback. In addition, the perceived effectiveness of near-peer feedback was correlated to portfolio scores (r =  0.23 and r =  0.28; p

 

Discussion 

This study found that feedback from near-peers and non-medical professionals could have a positive impact on medical students’ use of e-portfolios and should be considered when implementing a portfolio system.